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English Proficiency Test - Level One

1.- Present Simple of to be: Affirmative, negative and questions. 

Personal Pronouns

Affirmative

Negative

I                   (singular)

am

am not

He/she/it   (singular)

is

is not

You/we/they (Plural)

are

are not

Present Simple of to be: Affirmative and Negative

Using Contractions.

Personal Pronouns

Affirmative

Negative

I                 (singular)

‘m

‘m not

He/she/it   (singular)

‘s

isn’t

You/we/they(plural)

‘re

aren’t

Examples:

Affirmative Sentences

Negative sentences

Yes / No Questions

Short Answers

I am happy

I’m not happy

Am I happy?

Yes, you are

No, you aren’t

You are a nervous boy.

You aren’t a nervous boy.

Are you a nervous boy?

Yes, I am

No, I’m not

He is from Ecuador

He isn’t from Ecuador

Is he from Ecuador?

Yes, he is

No, he isn’t

She is a teacher

She isn’t a teacher

Is she a teacher?

Yes, she is

No, she isn’t

It is a beautiful dog.

It isn’t a beautiful dog.

Is it a beautiful dog?

Yes, it is

No, it isn’t

We are in the park.

We aren’t in the park

Are we in the park?

Yes, you are

No, you aren’t

You are good students.

You aren’t good students.

Are you good students?

Yes, we are

No, we aren’t

They are doctors.

They aren’t doctors.

Are they doctors?

Yes, they are

No, they aren’t

  • The pronoun YOU is either for singular and plural.
  • The pronouns HE-SHE-IT can replace the singular nouns. E.g.: Juan (He) / Lourdes (She)
  • The pronoun( I) is always written in Capital Letter. E.g.  I am a responsible student.
  • A personal pronoun goes at the beginning (comienzo) of the sentence.  E.g.: You are my parents.
  • The pronoun It  is used for things, animals or objects. (personas, animales o cosas).  E.g.:   We have an English book. It is interesting.
  • The personal pronouns (I, you, we, they) agree with the main verb. E.g.: I (you, we, they)   eat apples, bananas and oranges. Except the third person in singular. E.g.: He (She, it)  drinks water.

2. Possessive Adjectives

What’s your name?

My name is Anny.

Subject

pronoun

Possessive

adjective

I

You

She

He

It

We

they

my

your

her

his

its

our

their

Singular

 I am Rosita.

 You are Felipe

 He is Rafael.

 She is Gladys.

 It is Lukas (the dog)

 Mname is Rosita.

 Your name is Felipe 

 His name is Rafael. 

 Her name is Gladys.

 Its name is Lukas (the dog).

Plural

 We are Sofìa y Andrea

 You are Francisco y Marcelo.

 They are Juan and Marìa.

 Our names are Sofìa y Andrea.

 Your names are Francisco y Marcelo.

 Theinames are Juan and Marìa.

 

  • Where are you from?

I’m from Ecuador.

Exercise:                      (Review Vocabulary at the end of this Unit)

Name

Country

Nationality

Age

 Paulo

 Brazil

 Brazilian

 20 years old

 Irune

 Spain

 Spanish

 25 years old.

 Fiona and James

 Britain

 British

 18 and 17 years old

 Mònica

 Canada

 Canadian

 30 years old

 Sandra and Alfredo

 Italy

 Italian

 40 and 50 years old

 

  • His name is Paulo.  He’s from Brazil. He’s Brazilian. He’s twenty years old.
  • Her name is Irune.  She’s from Spain.  She’s Spanish. She’s twenty five years old.
  • Their names are Fiona and James. They’re from Britain. They’re British. They’re eighteen and seventeen years old.
  • Her name is Mónica. She’s from Canada.  She’s Canadian. She’s thirty years old.
  • Their names are Sandra and Alfredo. They’re from Italy.  They’re Italian. They’re 40 and 50 years old.

 

3.Questions

Questions with How, Where, Who and What

Question word + be + subject

Questions

Possible Answers

How are you?

How old is he?

Where are you from?

Where are you?

Who is your sister?

Who’s your classmate?

What do you do?

What is this?

Fine, thank you.

Twenty

I’m from Ecuador.

I’m in Loja.

My sister is Lourdes.

Luis.

I study English.

It’s a board.

Examples:

1.

How  are  you?

I’m fine, thanks, but I’m a little homesick.

5.

Who is your friend?

My friend is Juan Carlos.

2.

 

3.

Where are you from?

I’m from Loja-Ecuador.

How old are you?

6.

 

7.

Where is he from?

He’s from Loja, too.

Where is he right now?

 

4.

I’m twenty-four.

What do you eat in the morning?

I eat some bread and cheese.

 

He’s at home right now.

4. Plural Nouns

In general the plural of a noun is formed by adding -S to the noun.

Singular

Plural

car

cars

house

houses

book

books

bird

birds

pencil

pencils

 

Si embargo, However:

1. When the noun ends in SS, SH, CH or X, we add -ES to the noun.

Singular

Plural

kiss

kisses

wish

wishes

match

matches

box

boxes

fox

foxes

  • I have a box in my bedroom.
  • I have three boxes in my bedroom.

2. When the noun ends in a VOWEL + Y, we add -S to the noun.

Singular

Plural

boy

boys

holiday

holidays

key

keys

guy

guys

3. When the noun ends in a CONSONANT + Y, we remove Y and add -IES to the noun.

Singular

Plural

party

parties

lady

ladies

story

stories

nanny

nannies

city

cities

4. If the noun ends in F or FE, we remove the F/FE and add -VES to the noun.

Singular

Plural

life

lives

leaf

leaves

thief

thieves

wife

wives

5. If the noun ends in IS, we change it to ES.

Singular

Plural

analysis

analyses

basis

bases

crisis

crises

6. There are a number of nouns that don't follow these rules. They are irregular and you need to learn them individually because they don't normally have an S on the end.

Singular

Plural

man

men

woman

women

child

children

foot

feet

tooth

teeth

goose

geese

mouse

mice

  • There is a child in the park.
  • There are many children in the park.

7. There are some nouns in English that are the same in the singular and the plural.

Singular

Plural

fish

fish

sheep

sheep

deer

deer

moose

moose

aircraft

aircraft

  • I can see a sheep in the field.
  • I can see ten sheep in the field.

5. SIMPLE PRESENT TENSE: AFFIRMATIVE, NEGATIVE AND INTERROGATIVE WAY

 

Affirmative

Interrogative

Negative

1st person Singular

I wake up at 7 every day.

Do I wake up at 7 every day?

I do not wake up at 7 every day.

2nd person Singular

You like apples.

Do you like apples?

You do not like apples.

3rd person Singular

He plays football on Tuesdays.
She travels in summer.
It takes off at 9.

Does he play football on Tuesdays?
Does she travel in summer?
Does it take off at 9?

He does not play football on Tuesdays.
She does not travel in summer.
It does not take off at 9.

1st person Plural

We pay our bills monthly.

Do we pay our bills monthly?

We do not pay our bills monthly.

2nd person Plural

You eat twice a day.

Do you eat twice a day?

You do not eat twice a day.

3rd person Plural

They usually ski in December.

Do they usually ski in December?

They do not usually ski in December.

 

How do I form Present Simple?

Affirmative

Subject + Verb I + (...)
e.g.: I (subject) wake up (verb) at 7 every day.

1st person, sg. → I read daily.
3rd person, sg. → He reads daily.

1st person, sg. → I often watch TV.
3rd person, sg. → He often watches TV.

Remember that:

  • For the 1st person (sg. and pl.), the 2nd person (sg. and pl.) and the 3rd person pl., the verb has the same form. Only the 3rd person sg. functions differently.
  • The verb is used in its first form, e.g.: I read. The first form is the infinitive form without to. At the 3rd person sg., we add an s at the end of the verb, e.g.: He reads.
  • Some verbs take an es (instead of an s) at the end for the 3rd person sg., e.g.: He watches TV.
  • The verbs to be and to have behave differently: a) See how to use the verb to be; b) The verb to have has an irregular form for the 3rd person sg. → He has an apple.

Interrogative

Do / Does + Subject + Verb I + (...) + ?
e.g.: Do I (subject) wake up (verb) at 7 every day?

1st person, sg. → Do I read daily?
3rd person, sg. → Does he read daily?

1st person, sg. → Do I often watch TV?
3rd person, sg. → Does he often watch TV?

Remember that:

  • In interrogative sentences, we use the auxiliary verbs do or does.
  • We use do for the 1st and 2nd persons (sg. and pl.) and for the 3rd person pl.. We use does for the 3rd person sg..
  • In interrogative sentences, we do NOT add s or es at the end of the verb for the 3rd person sg..
  • The short answer for a Present Simple question is:
    • Affirmative: Yes, I do (for I, you, we, you, they) or Yes, he does (for he, she, it)
    • Negative: No, I don't = No, I do not (for I, you, we, you, they) or No, he doesn't = No, he does not (for he, she, it)

Negative

Subject + Do Not / Does Not + Verb I + (...)
e.g.: I (subject) do not wake up (verb) at 7 every day.

1st person, sg. → I do not read daily.
3rd person, sg. → He does not read daily.

1st person, sg. → I do not watch TV often.
3rd person, sg. → He does not watch TV often.

Remember that:

  • In negative sentences, we use the auxiliary verbs do or does and the adverb not.
  • We use do not for the 1st and 2nd persons (sg. and pl.) and for the 3rd person pl.. We use does not for the 3rd person sg..
  • In negative sentences, we do NOT add s or es at the end of the verb for the 3rd person sg..
  • The short form of do not is don't. The short form of does not is doesn't. e.g.: I don't like horror movies. He doesn't like action movies.

7. Prepositions of Place

 1. The ball is behind the box.

  2. The ball is above the box.

  3. The ball is in the box.

 4. The ball is next to the box.

  5. The ball is on the box

  6. The ball is below the box.

 7. The ball is near to the box.

  8. The ball is between the box and the bear.

 

Look at this map of the mall and read the statements.

1.   Max Mart store is next to Discount Dru

2.   The Music Center store is between Discount Drugs store and Fast Food Burger.

3.   Max Mart store is on the second floor.

It’s above Grandma’s cookies store.

4.   Grandma’s cookies store and Famous Fashions store are on the first floor.

They are below Max- Mart Store.

5.   The stores are in the mall